Special Issue


Title: Clinical Studies of Molecular Targeted Therapies

Call for special issue: International Archives of Translational Medicine is an Open Access, peer reviewed, international online journal that aims to publish premier papers on all the areas of translational medicine. International Archives of Translational Medicine focus on understanding the molecular mechanism of diseases, including disease biomarkers, molecular diagnosis, drug delivery, target therapies.

Moving forward, we are pleased to announce the special issue on "Clinical Studies of Molecular Targeted Therapies". Preclinical studies have led to certain intriguing arenas that are being translated in to clinical settings. One of such fields that are gaining attention is molecular targets based therapies. We recognize that there are enough evidences that such therapies could result in better patient management in clinics. Therefore, this special issue serves as a great platform to share such studies. This special issue on "Clinical Studies of Molecular Targeted Therapies" invites articles in all categories such as original research, review, short communication, case report, commentary, letters, case series and perspectives. A detailed timeline for publication in this special issue is provided below.

 

Handling Editor
Abdullah Shafique Ahmad

Assistant Professor
Department of Anesthesiology
University of Florida
USA
Tel: 352-294-5107

Short biography

Dr. Abdullah Shafique Ahmad is an Assistant Professor of Department of Anesthesiology. He received Travel Award from University of Florida-McKnight Brain Institute at International Stroke Conference 2014. He received his doctorate from University of Florida. His research interests include Behavioral and molecular neuropharmacology; focused on the neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative processes which is a common feature in many neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders.


Title: Drug Delivery & Nano Particles

Aim and scope: Developing theory and method of drug delivery and designing novel nanoparticles for diagnosis and therapy of diseases are very important for promoting the development of medicine. The aim of this special issue is to provide a peer-reviewed forum for publication of original papers, review, short communication, case report, commentary, letters, case series and perspectives dealing with most important issue facing the nanoparticles for drug delivery, diagnosis and therapy, as well as the theory and method of drug delivery. The scope of this specials issue covers the wide range of materials, chemical, physical, biological, medical and pharmaceutical sciences that underpin the theory and method of drug delivery and design and biomedical applications of nanoparticles.

 

Handling Editor
Maoquan Chu

Professor
Tongji University
Research Center for Translational Medicine
China
Tel: 086-21-65988653

Short biography

Dr. Maoquan Chu received his Ph.D. degree from East China University of Science and Technology in 2001. He then did his postdoctoral work in school of life science and technology in Shanghai Jiaotong University, where he delved into nano-biomedicine. In 2004, he joined the school of life science and technology in Tongji University. He was granted the title of professor in 2008 at Tongji University. Now he is also a professor at Research Center for Translational Medicine at Shanghai East Hospital in China. His research interfaces with biology, medicine, pharmacy and nanomaterials science. His research focuses on cancer imaging and therapy using nanotechnology, Nano-biomaterials for drug delivery, cancer imaging and therapy.


Title: Novel Biomarkers

Biomarkers are the foundation of clinical medicine. Novel technologies and statistical approaches have accelerated the discovery of biomarkers for precision medicine. However, the promise of precision medicine lies in the ability to efficiently and quickly detect and interpret biomarker profiles of health, diagnosis of disease, and treatment and recovery from illness. New areas of research are emerging to include systems level approaches to biomarker profiling, less of a reliance on animal modeling, adaptive clinical trial designs, and the development of next generation point of care technologies. This special edition will address these promising areas of research and discuss the future of precision medicine through novel approaches to biomarker profiling.

 

Handling Editor
Taura L Barr

Assistant Professor
Department of Health Restoration
West Virginia University
USA
Tel: 304-293-0503

Short biography

My program of research is centered on the use of genomic methodologies and preclinical models to identify and implement clinically relevant biomarkers and pathways associated with human ischemic stroke and brain injury to design novel translatable therapeutic strategies for treatment. My training has spanned from basic preclinical models of disease mechanism, to qualitative research methods to understand the human response to disease and the implications for clinical practice. As a result of this transdisciplinary training I am experienced in developing and conducting innovative clinical translational research studies that not only aim to understand the human response to brain injury, but change the way we study this devastating and common disease. An important component of my program is mentoring the next generation of translational researchers. I have mentored multidisciplinary students from undergraduate nursing, medical residency and biomedical graduate students. http://www.hsc.wvu.edu/wvucn/Faculty---Lab-Personnel/Barr/Barr-Home.

 

Title: Novel Biomarkers

Biomarkers are the foundation of clinical medicine. Novel technologies and statistical approaches have accelerated the discovery of biomarkers for precision medicine. However, the promise of precision medicine lies in the ability to efficiently and quickly detect and interpret biomarker profiles of health, diagnosis of disease, and treatment and recovery from illness. New areas of research are emerging to include systems level approaches to biomarker profiling, less of a reliance on animal modeling, adaptive clinical trial designs, and the development of next generation point of care technologies. This special edition will address these promising areas of research and discuss the future of precision medicine through novel approaches to biomarker profiling.

 

Handling Editor
Karin Reuter-Rice

Assistant Professor
Department of Pediatrics
Duke University School of Nursing
USA

Short biography

Karin Reuter-Rice is an assistant professor in the Duke University School of Nursing, School of Medicine, and the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences. She is a pediatric nurse practitioner with clinical expertise in pediatric critical care, a fellow of the American College of Critical Care Medicine, the American Academy of Nursing, the NIH-NINR Summer Genetics Institute, and is a co-editor of the textbook Pediatric Acute Care: A Guide for Interprofessional Practice. Her commitment to the care of critically ill and injured children and their families has led Dr. Reuter-Rice to focus her research in the area of trauma and head injury. With a collaborative research team approach, NIH-NINR and RWJF support, Dr. Reuter-Rice examines the relationship between genetic associations, cerebral vasospasm and outcomes in pediatric TBI. In addition to her research and practice in the critical care unit, she teaches and mentors students in the care of acutely ill and injured children. Areas of research interest are Pediatrics, Critical Care, Genetics, Trauma, Biomarkers Associated with Brain Injury, Neurocognitive-Functional Outcomes, Traumatic Brain Injury, Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound, Vasospasm, Victimization.