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Research Article  |   Volume 2, Issue 12

Screening For Depressive Symptoms at the Beginning of Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation by Assessed Perceived Risk Factors by Patients

Saeid Komasi and Mozhgan Saeidi
Abstract

Objectives:The screening for depressive symptoms at the beginning of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation (CR) can significantly increase the quality and quantity of clinical care. This study investigated the degree of depressive symptoms in CR patients according to what they perceived to be the underlying causes of their disease. Methods:The administrative data for this cross-sectional study was obtained from the database of the CR department at Imam Ali hospital in the city of Kermanshah in Iran. Demographic and clinical information for 602 patients was gathered between April 2006 and April 2011 using forms compiled from the database, the Beck depression inventory, and the structured clinical interview for axis I disorders (SCID-I).

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410081

Case Report  |   Volume 2, Issue 12

Massive Urinothorax; A Rare Complication after Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

Ibrahim Halil Bozkurt, Salih Polat, Ismail Gulden, Serkan Yarimoglu, Ozgu Aydogdu, Tarik Yonguc and Volkan Sen
Abstract

The urinothorax or collection of urine in the pleural space is a rare complication following percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). We present a case of massive urinothorax who had undergone PCNL. Two weeks after PCNL, the patient was admitted to the emergency clinic with dyspnea, chest pain and fever. Thorax and abdomen computed tomography (CT) revealed massive pleural effusion on the left hemithorax and a stone located at the proximal segment of left ureter. A chest tube and a ureteral DJ stent was placed for drainage. In conclusion, the patients who underwent PCNL via intercostal access and had residual stones should be closely followed-up for signs and symptoms of urinothorax.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410080

Case Report  |   Volume 2, Issue 12

'Dairy-Free' Dietary Substitute, Abdominal Pain, and Weight Loss

Margaret R. Coleman and Mary Thoesen Coleman
Abstract

A 62 year-old Caucasian female experienced cramping abdominal pain of two months' duration associated with 12 pound unintentional weight loss. Laboratory workup, computed tomography scan of abdomen and pelvis and colonoscopy revealed no etiology. Elimination of carrageenan-containing almond milk from her diet which she had substituted for cow's milk several months prior resulted in stabilization of weight and resolution of symptoms. Conclusion:Certain food substitutions for dairy products may expose patients to additives like carrageenan, for which there is early evidence of its contribution to gastrointestinal disturbances. Considering an etiology for gastrointestinal symptoms brought on by dietary additives in the diagnostic differential gives the practitioner avenues to pursue prior to ordering expensive testing and treatments.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410079

Case Report  |   Volume 2, Issue 12

Patellar Tendon Rupture. Repair with Suture Anchors and Percutaneous Reinforcement with Semitendinosus and Gracilis Tendons: Two Cases

Manuel Godino
Abstract

Patellar tendon disruptions are relatively uncommon knee injuries compared to fractures, ligaments sprains, or meniscal tears [1]. These tears may be traumatic or they may occur spontaneously in patients with other underlying diseases such as diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, steroid medication or kidney failure. MRI can also be useful, by providing additional information such as the location of the rupture. We reported one case of neglected patellar disruption and the other case was traumatic. Several techniques have been used to relocate the patella to its anatomic position and repair the patellar tendon, but there is no widely accepted method.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410078

Case Report  |   Volume 2, Issue 12

Long-Segment Slide Tracheo-Bronchoplasty (LSTB) with Contralateral Lung Agenesis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

Daniel J. Weber, Mark D.Rodefeld, Bruce H. Matt and John W. Brown
Abstract

The management of long-segment tracheal stenosis (LSTS) can be quite challenging, particularly in the presence of other pulmonary anomalies. We present a complicated case of LSTS and left bronchial stenosis in a 4-month-old infant with a congenitally absent right lung. This case emphasize that a slide tracheo-bronchoplasty (STB) in the setting of congenital absence of the contralateral lung is complicated but can be performed with reasonable results.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410077

Hypothesis  |   Volume 2, Issue 12

Hypothesizing Balancing Endorphinergic and Glutaminergic Systems to Treat and Prevent Relapse to Reward Deficiency Behaviors: Coupling D-Phenylalanine and N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC) as a Novel Therapeutic Modality

Kenneth Blum, Marcelo Febo, Claudia Fahlke, Trevor Archer, U Berggren, Zsolt Demetrovics, Kristina Dushaj and Rajendra D. Badgaiyan
Abstract

In this hypothesis, we are proposing that the combination of D-Phenylalanine and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) - two substances that have never been utilized together - is an important advancement to treat Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) [1]. The key motivation for this notion is that the combination will have synergistic attributes to induce dopamine release as well as dopamine stabilization at the brain reward circuitry via different mechanisms. We hypothesize that preferential release of Dopamine, for example, at the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) along with glutaminergic homeostasis induces not only the release, but also the appropriate regulation of dopamine function that could lead to required Dopamine Homeostasis.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410076

Case Report  |   Volume 2, Issue 12

Coxofemoral Arthritis Caused by Mycobacterium Bovis after Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Therapy

R Bouchentouf, K Idrissi Koulali, O Ghoundale, A Elktaibi and A Benjelloun
Abstract

BCG therapy is the standard treatment for superficial bladder tumors. However, this treatment is not devoid of local and systemic side effects such as flu-like symptoms, liver granulomatosis, damage of both the gastrointestinal and the urinary tracts and bone lesions. Rheumatological complications such as arthralgia, reactive arthritis and osteoarticular infections, although rare, were reported after BCG therapy.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410075

Case Report  |   Volume 2, Issue 12

Reactive Edema after Endoscopic Polipectomy Simulating a polypoid Lesion: A New Pitfall in CT Colonography

Francesco Lassandro, Luigi Urciuoli, Marilina D'Amora, Tullio Valente, Giulia Lassandro and Enrica Barra
Abstract

Computed Tomography Colonography (CTC) is a feasible and minimally invasive technique widely accepted both for screening and diagnosis of colon cancer. The major limit of CTC compared to optical endoscopy resides in its minor specificity due to false positive findings. Several non-pathologic aspects mimicking true polyps are described in medical literature and are well known to radiologists. In this study we report seven pathologically documented cases of reactive edema appearing after a previous endoscopic polipectomy. This represents another possible and relatively common source of false positive examination of which radiologists should be aware when interpreting CTC after previous endoscopic removal of polyps.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410074

Case Report  |   Volume 2, Issue 12

Trapped in a Breathless Condition - A Case Report and Discussion of a Malignant Pleural Effusion and Trapped Lung

Ashima Lal, Paul L Desandre and Tammie E Quest
Abstract

A 26 year old male with no significant past medical history presented in March of 2015 with hematuria found to have bilateral renal masses - large mixed cystic/solid lesions on computerized tomography. He was diagnosed with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma with metastasis to the lymph nodes and pulmonary nodules suspicious of metastasis. Shortly after diagnosis, he completed 3 cycles of chemotherapy (sunitinib) prior to developing a pleural effusion, requiring thoracentesis for symptom relief as an outpatient procedure. With progression of disease, his chemotherapy was switched to temsirolimus, however his condition continued to deteriorate.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410073

Case Report  |   Volume 2, Issue 12

Use of Infraclavicular Temporary Perineural Catheter in the Exercise for Range of Joint Motion - Case Report

Ilke Kupeli, Ufuk Kuyrukluyildiz, Hakan Gokalp Tas and Aysin Alagol
Abstract

Olecranon fractures are the most common type of injury seen in the upper extremities and restricted joint mobility may be developed due to the long plaster cast time. Most of these patients will be required to participate in intense physical therapy in order to maintain and increase range of motion postoperatively. This physiotherapy process is a serious stressor for these patients because of pain. In addition to several modalities such as systemic administration of opioids, permanent/temporary perineural catheters are used in order to decrease pain and allow patients to exercise more comfortably.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410072


Volume 2
Issue 12