Archive

Research Article Open Access

Gel Bleed and Rupture of Silicone Breast Implants Investigated by Light-, Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis of Internal Organs and Nervous Tissue

R.M. Kappel, L.L. Boer and H. Dijkman
Clin Med Rev Case Rep Volume 3, Issue 1

Abstract: Some women, who have received silicone breast implants either for breast augmentation or breast reconstruction, develop health problems in different gradations over the years and a thorough explanation for this has yet to be given this is because this kind of research can only be performed on living humans. In addition, as the existence of associated complaints is still largely denied and neglected by the various medical disciplines, they are not recorded in medical histories of the involved women and thus do not appear in meta analyses.

PDF   | Full Text   DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410087

Case Report Open Access

Chronic Stimulant Use: An Upcoming Cause of Neurocognitive Disorder in Later Life?

Anne Jacobs, Sonja C. Stalpers-Konijnenburg, Cornelis A. de Jong and Radboud M. Marijnissen
Clin Med Rev Case Rep Volume 3, Issue 1

Abstract: A 58-year-old woman was admitted to a psychiatric ward because of a psychotic episode. Psychiatric history revealed chronic daily stimulant use for more than thirty years, specifically cocaine, amphetamine and nicotine. She also suffered from a psychotic episode at the age of 23 after the death of a child. Medical history did not report any somatic comorbidities.

PDF   | Full Text   DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410086

Case Report Open Access

Unusual Early Aortic Valve Bioprosthesis Failure due to Fungal Infection

Yolanda Carrascal, Gregorio Laguna and Nuria Arce
Clin Med Rev Case Rep Volume 3, Issue 1

Abstract: We report an early failure of a 19 mm mitroflow A12 aortic pericardial bioprosthetic valve. We excluded all described causes related with early bioprosthesis calcification and degeneration. Neither inflammatory cells nor bacterial colonization were identified in microscopic analysis, but fungal hyphae were observed in the tissue sections from both leaflets, suggesting sub-clinical fungal endocarditis, which might have contributed to early failure.

PDF   | Full Text   DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410085

Original Research Article Open Access

Therapeutic Efficacy of Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections in Treating Chronic High Hamstring Tendinopathy

Jeffrey Krauss, Ryan Nugent, Marko Bodor and Michael Fredericson
Clin Med Rev Case Rep Volume 3, Issue 1

Abstract: Objective: To determine whether ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections reduce pain and improve function in patients with chronic high hamstring tendinopathy. Design: Prospective case-control study in which patients who have failed treatment serve as their own controls. Setting: Patients were recruited through two sports medicine clinics, one academically based and the other in a community medical center. Injections were performed by a single practitioner. Patients: 14 adult patients with chronic high hamstring tendinopathy who previously failed physical therapy. All patients had both positive clinical findings and MRI evidence of high hamstring tendinopathy.

PDF   | Full Text   DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410084

Case Report Open Access

Is Cock-up Splint the Right Choice for All of the Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Patients? A Case Report

Mahdi Hadidi, Mohammad-Reza Hadian, Ali Arab Kheradmand, Mahmood Farzan, Hamidreza Monsef, Maryam-Raheleh Dadras, Saeed Talebian and Gholam Reza Olyaei
Clin Med Rev Case Rep Volume 3, Issue 1

Abstract: A fifty-year-old woman was the exceptional one who her clinical signs and symptoms was deteriorated after the administration of splinting. She showed deterioration of clinical and electrophysiological parameters after two weeks of using splint combined with steroid. After removing the splint, the patient showed relief of subsequent signs and symptoms.

PDF   | Full Text   DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410083

Short Communication Open Access

Non-operative Treatment for Extensive Skin Necrosis of a Neonatal Dorsal Foot caused by Extravasation

Hiromu Masuoka, Susumu Saito, Yoko Nakamura and Shigehiko Suzuki
Clin Med Rev Case Rep Volume 3, Issue 1

Abstract: We herein describe two cases of non-surgical treatment for skin necrosis of the dorsum of the neonatal foot caused by extravasation. In both the cases, closure of the defects was achieved after 3 months of conservative treatment without any complications. Although the defects occupied almost all of the dorsal skin of the foot, no significant contracture disabling the toe or ankle occurred during the maximum follow-up period of 9 years. Non-surgical treatments could be an alternative treatment for neonatal skin necrosis caused by extravasation.

PDF   | Full Text   DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410082

Volume 3
Issue 1