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Case Report  |   Volume 3, Issue 6

Acute Diarrhea Secondary to Pseudomembranous Colitis in the Adulthood, a Diagnostic Challenge: Case Report

Freddy A. Rodriguez-Hernandez, Giselle Blanco-Lamont, Cinthia Patricia Vargas-Chavez, Maria Valeria Jimenez-Baez, Cristian Alejandro Aguirre-Alva, Luis Sandoval-Jurado and Luis A. Medina-Andrade
Abstract

An 84 years-old female presented at emergency room with abdominal pain and diarrhea. Pathological background include arterial hypertension treated with losartan 100 mg/24h, cardiac arrhythmia treated with propafenona 75 mg/24h, osteoarthritis treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (COX-2) and chronic diarrhea for the last three months treated with quinolones.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410114

Case Report  |   Volume 3, Issue 6

Three-Vessel Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection in an Old Woman

Huseyin Bozbas, Tugba Kayhan Altuner, Ezgi Polat Ocakli, Mehmet Sanser Ates, Murat Kurtoglu and Mehmet Emin Korkmaz
Abstract

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is one of the rare causes of acute coronary syndrome. Regarding the etiology, it is classified broadly into 2 groups: atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic. It is more common in females and left anterior descending coronary artery is the most commonly involved artery. Optimal therapy for SCAD is not well-defined. Treatment options include a conservative approach, percutaneous intervention, and bypass grafting surgery. We present an old woman with three-vessel SCAD. She was admitted with acute coronary syndrome. By angiography, SCAD was identified in all three coronary arteries.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410113

Case Report  |   Volume 3, Issue 6

Successful Treatment of Insomnia with Melatonin in a Patient with Malignant Glioma after Radiotherapy-Involving the Pineal Gland

Andrea Reim, David Strobl, Gerda Saletu-Zyhlarz, Matthias Preusser, Maria Theresia Schmook, Karin Dieckmann, Christoph C Zielinski and Christine Marosi
Abstract

A recent survey reported on conspicuous prevalence and severity of sleep disorders in patients with cancer. Insomnia is defined as difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep - with wake episodes of more than half an hour, unintended early awakening and/or non restorative sleep. This symptom complex qualifies as insomnia when it occurs at least three times a week, results in distress and impairs day time functioning. In cancer patients, especially in patients complaining about fatigue, insomnia is under diagnosed and undertreated.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410112

Case Report  |   Volume 3, Issue 6

Variant Angina Induced Life-Threatening Ventricular Arrhythmias: does Dual Calcium Channel Blocker Eliminates the Indication for Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator?

Maroun Matar, Elie Chammas and Samer Nasr
Abstract

A 49-year-old white female tailor that works for a subcontractor at Clemenceau medical center, had in 25/10/2010, a severe substernal chest pain with left shoulder and bilateral arm pain, followed by near collapse. Nursing staff at the hospital who is very well acquainted with her, since she is an extremely gentle person, rushed and connected her to a monitor that showed a polymorphic ventricular tachycardia followed by ventricular fibrillation.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410111

Case Report  |   Volume 3, Issue 6

Primary Epiploic Appendagitis

Neha Gupta, Tony A Abdel Maseeh, Leyden Standish-Parkin and Yekaterina Sitnitskaya
Abstract

Epiploic appendagitis is a rare diagnosis in pediatric population. It is a benign, self-limiting condition caused by infarction, torsion or thrombosis of the fatty appendages on the serosal surface of the colon. It can be a diagnostic dilemma as it can mimic acute appendicitis or diverticulitis, depending on its location. We report a case of a teenage girl who presented with right lower quadrant abdominal pain without any associated vomiting, fever, and diarrhea. Laboratory work up was non-contributory.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410110

Case Report  |   Volume 3, Issue 6

The Biliary Sinus: A Rare Late-Stage Complication of Cholecystectomy

Ihsan Yildiz, Yavuz Savas Koca and Ibrahim Barut
Abstract

A 53-year-old female patient who had undergone open cholecystectomy due to cholelithiasis 6 years earlier was admitted to hepatobiliary surgery unit with a painful mass in the right upper quadrant and fever. Ultrasonography showed that a 3-cm fluid-filled mass in the right upper quadrant subcutaneously, in computed tomography a fluid-filled tubular lesion extending from the right lobe of liver to right upper quadrant, and percutaneous cholangiography showed that a radio-opaque density communicating with the liver. The biliary sinus tract was totally excised. The patient was uneventfully discharged on day 6 after the surgery. Histopathological examination of the lesion was reported as a bile sinus.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410109