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Review Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Cross-sectional Survey: Public Attitude toward Mental Illness in China

Anson Chui Yan Tang
Abstract

Public attitude toward mental illness is usually negative in many western and Asian countries. Both qualitative and quantitative studies have reported that Chinese societies possess a lower benevolence toward and impose more social restriction on the mentally ill. People with mental illnesses are being labelled as dangerous and aggressive, and their families are being disapproved of and devalued.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510025

Commentary  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Making IPE Work: Idea to Actualization

Kimberly A. Udlis and Stephanie Stewart
Abstract

According to the World Health Organization Interprofessional Care (IPC) is linked with improved outcomes in family health infectious disease humanitarian efforts, responses to epidemics and non-communicable disease. Others improvements with IPC are noted in access to care and coordination of services, appropriate use of specialty care, chronic disease outcomes and safety. Safety indicators include complications and error rates, lengths of stay, conflict among care givers, staff turnover and mortality rates which are improved in collaborative care environments.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510024

Research Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Combining Breastfeeding and Employment: The Salient Beliefs of Nurses Working Shift Work in a Hospital

Sarah Mestepey, Susan K. Steele-Moses and Annette Knobloch
Abstract

Combining breastfeeding and employment has been a struggle for mothers for many years. Working mothers are pressed to find a balance between employment responsibilities and the duties of motherhood. Until recent legislation, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, there were essentially no federal regulations to protect a woman's breastfeeding rights; even the latest legislation is far from inclusive toward the protection of a woman's liberty to maintain lactation once she returns to work.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510023

Research Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Patient Reported Outcome in a New Home-Based Rehabilitation Programme for Prostate Cancer Patients

Brigitta R Villumsen and Britta Hordam
Abstract

The most optimal and individual exercise plan for men with prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy needs to be identified. We plan to investigate in these patients the effect of a 12-week home-based exercise programme on physical function, fatigue and metabolic parameters. We will also investigate the satisfaction and experience with the exercise tool. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study to investigate the effect of an interactive video gaming console on a home-based exercise programme. No statistical analysis have been made so far because inclusion is still ongoing, but baseline observations show, that most of the participants fulfil more of the criteria for being diagnosed with metabolic syndrome.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510022

Research Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Difficulties with Stress Management Faced by Nurse Managers: A Survey of Nurse Managers at a University Hospital

Mariko Kaneko and Ryoko Kakehi
Abstract

This study revealed that the stress management support system for nurse managers is inadequate and that nurse managers need to learn better stress management techniques. Moreover, a viable system providing stress management seminars, immediately linking available resources and creating a stress-free work environment needs to be established. Finally, a stress management care system for nurses, including nurse managers, needs to be implemented.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510021

Review Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

An Integrative Review of Sickle Cell and Depression

Kimberly L. Tartt, Susan J. Appel, Valerie Mann-Jiles, Kahlil Demonbreun and John Langlow III
Abstract

Purpose:Gain insight and knowledge through the exploration of depression among adult patients living with chronic illness such as sickle cell disease. The review focused on defining the prevalence of depression in chronic illness with emphasis on sickle cell. Associated chronic pain, quality of life, disease trajectory and the need for increased screening and treatment for depression in chronic illness such as with those living with sickle cell disease will be evaluated. Data Sources:A search of the following databases: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Library, Ovid/Medline, PubMed and Google Scholar between (2003-2014).

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510020

Case Report  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Novelties in the Treatment of Diabetic Foot: Hyperbaric Oxygen and Rich Platelet Plasma Therapy

Ana Maria Arnaiz-Garcia
Abstract

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is useful as an adjunct or primary therapy of multiple processes, such as gas embolism, carbon monoxide poisoning, decompression treatments, myonecrosis, ischemic traumatic injuries, compartment syndrome, severe anemia, brain abscesses dued to Actinomyces spp., necrotizing infections, refractory osteomyelitis, radiation necrosis, burns and it is also useful in situations in which the evolution of a graft or skin flap is unfavorable despite other treatments.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510019

Review Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Psychometric Evaluation of Clinical Learning Motivation Scale

Behice Erci
Abstract

Motivation is the occurrence acting, learning and moving feelings in human beings. Motivation in work life can be described as additional rights and rewards for working people to do their jobs better, more qualified and faster and also to occur their feelings. In having motivation a person must first believe that he is able to manage the work before he has decided.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510018

Short Commentary  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Illuminating the Mystique of Honor in Nursing

Paulina Van
Abstract

Honor in nursing contributes to the profession and practice of nursing and, more importantly, to the lives nurses touch. HONOR also serves as a mnemonic that can guide nurses as they seek to bring honor to themselves and the profession. Through attention to their hearts, opportunities, never being complacent, providing outstanding care and reflecting, nurses can transform nursing practice and patient encounters into outstanding optimal care, maintaining their standing as the most honorable profession in the United States.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510017

Short Commentary  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

'Stop, Drop and Run,' Physical Fitness Program for Firefighters Created by Nurses at a Regional Burn Center

Steven A Kahn, Alexa Hinton, Amanda Gonzales and Teri Huff
Abstract

Historically, fire departments have worked in conjunction with the multidisciplinary team of nurses, doctors and other healthcare providers that care for thermally injured patients at burn centers. The close relationship and shared ideals between burn centers and fire department allows them to combine resources to better serve individual patients, but also the community at large through outreach and community education related to safety, fire prevention and injury prevention.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510016

Review article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Creative and Innovative Mentoring Program for Improving Diverse Students in Education

Sharon Elizabeth Metcalfe
Abstract

Despite the increased diversity and multicultural transformation of the population within the United States, the majority of nurses in the workforce are found to be educated from Caucasian backgrounds. At present, there is minimal inclusion of students from underrepresented ethnic minorities, as well as students from the rural Appalachian region. This article describes an innovative and creative mentoring program that was implemented at a university to increase the diversity of the student enrollment in nursing.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510015

Research Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Obesity: A Persistent Global Health Problem

Linda Eanes
Abstract

Despite extensive public attention given to diet and exercise as effective counter measures to obesity and obesity-related problems, there has been no significant reduction in obesity rates in the United States and throughout the world. The author provides a brief update on obesity, dietary and physical activity guidelines, potential contributing factors to behavioral change and the role that nurses have in advancing health promoting activities that can reduce the health risks associated with obesity.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510014

Review Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Monitoring Patients with Chronic Heart Failure Using a Telemedicine Platform: Contribution of the E-Care and INCADO Projects

Emmanuel Andres, Samy Talha, Ahmed Benyahia A, Olivier Keller, Mohamed Hajjam, Jawad Hajjam, Sylvie Erve, Justine Boehler, Catherine Grohens and Amir Hajjam
Abstract

Monitoring patients with heart failure by telemedicine systems is a potential means susceptible to optimize the management of these patients and avoid life-threatening emergencies. In this context, we experimented in real life an e-platform dedicated to automated, intelligent detection of situations at risk of heart failure.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510013

Research Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

A Scoping Review of Research Involving Nurses and Electronic Health Records in Middle Eastern Countries

Gillian Strudwick, Ai Tanimizu, Sandhya Nilacka Saraswathy, Sara Yousef and Veronica Nickerson
Abstract

Nurses effective and efficient use of electronic health records (EHRs) is essential for the successful adoption of the technology. In recent years, countries within the Middle East have experienced an increase in the installation and implementation of such technologies, with nurses representing the largest user group. As such, the aim of this literature review is to understand the scope of research containing nurse participants related to the technology and its use in the region.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510012

Research Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Stress Reduction with the Transcendental Meditation Program in Caregivers: A Pilot Study

Sanford Nidich, Randi J Nidich, John Salerno, Brooke Hadfield and Charles Elder
Abstract

Objective: To determine feasibility and potential effects of the transcendental meditation TM (TM) technique on caregivers' mental health and spiritual well-being. Methods: Twenty-three caregivers learned the TM program over five sessions and attended twice monthly group meetings over a two month period. Participants practiced at home for twenty minutes twice a day. Outcomes included perceived stress using Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale, Total Mood Disturbance using the profile of Mood States (POMS), spiritual well-being using the FACIT scale, and levels of stress and perceived physical health using the Caregiver Self-Assessment Questionnaire.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510011

Letter to Editor  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Can Alzheimer's Patients Receive and Store Information in Late Stage of the Disease and Can Memory be Restored if the Amyloid Plaques are Removed?

Fredrik C Stormer
Abstract

Never underestimate an Alzheimer's patient. Patients with Alzheimer's disease may be able to use information from the past and also use information that was accumulated during the disease if they get rid of the amyloid plaques. Recently the removal of beta amyloid plaques in a mouse model has been reported. Beta amyloid plaques accumulates in the spaces between neurons and interfere with communication between them. The mice were exposed to scanning ultrasound treatment and 75% of cleared plaques were observed.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510010

Review Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

The Impact of Advanced Cardiac Life Support to Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Perceived Competence in Performing Resuscitation Skills

Jodie C Gary, Brian E Holland and Angela Mulcahy
Abstract

The perceived competence of nursing students in performing resuscitation after completing an ACLS certification course was explored. This evaluation will aid in program evaluation and serve as a basis for further investigation. Baccalaureate nursing students receiving ACLS certification in the final semester of their nursing education self-reported an increase in perceived confidence related to performing resuscitation following the ACLS course.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510009

Research Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

The Effects of High Fidelity Simulation on Nursing Students' Perceptions and Self-Efficacy of Obstetric Skills

Gul Pinar, Candace C Knight, Vanessa P Gaioso, Penni I Watts, Kelly D Dailey, Sylvia E Britt, Kelley S Catron and Ferhat D Zengul
Abstract

A descriptive, and correlational study design was utilized. Convenience sampling was conducted among junior level baccalaureate nursing students who were enrolled in a maternal child health nursing course at a large public university. The simulation experiences included nine different scenarios that highlighted critical obstetric concepts. Three instruments were used to gather data: (a) a demographic survey, (b) the Simulation Evaluation Form, and (c) the Simulation Design Scale. Student feedback also was assessed through qualitative open-ended questions. There were three simulation sessions.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510008

Review Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Training and Professional Development for Nurses and Healthcare Support Workers: Supporting Foundation for Quality and Good Practice for Care of the Acutely III Older Person

Inderpal Singh
Abstract

The healthcare needs of older people require a multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach where all team members have knowledge of the ageing process. Specific skills are needed in the assessment and management of chronic illness in older people. Team members should have the ability to practice in an interdisciplinary environment to deliver appropriate care for older people, particularly those who are frail or at risk of adverse clinical events.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510007

Case Report  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Observed Experiences: Cultural Differences in Caring for Dying Patients in Malaysia

Loh Ee Chin
Abstract

Little has been described about the cultural differences in caring for dying patients in Malaysia. This paper outlines three case studies in which the simple action of hair combing for patients by relations of different ethnicity, language, and cultural background may convey very different meanings to the people involved. The cases add insight to our understanding as practitioners on how we should seek to understand and be aware of the differences between ourselves and the people we care for in order to personalize the delivery of palliative care.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510006

Research Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Exploring the Experiences of Nurses Who Attended the Spirituality and Nursing Conference: 'The Art of Healing Presence: The Essence of Nursing Practice'

Amanda Bulette Coakley and Anne-Marie Barron
Abstract

For four years, nurses at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital have collaboratively offered an annual conference on Spirituality in Nursing Practice. The planning committee developed a process for comprehensive assessment of the meaning of the conference with the participants for the 2012 conference. Two members (the authors) developed pre and post conference surveys, which were sent to all nurses registered for the conference. The purpose of this study was to gain a greater understanding of nurses' expectations of attending and their experiences at the conference.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510005

Short Communication  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Common Errors in the Measurement of Blood Pressure

Abstract

Norman Kaplan said "The measurement of blood pressure is likely the clinical procedure of greatest importance that is performed in the sloppiest manner." It is of great importance that common and often overlooked errors in the measurement of blood pressure be addressed. Firstly, I would like to emphasize the importance of proper cuff size. It is well known that miscuffing or using an improper cuff size can lead to an inaccurate blood pressure measurement.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510004

Research Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Asking about Postpartum Depressive Symptoms - An Easy Way to Identify Maternal Distress at 18 Months?

Lagerberg D and Magnusson M
Abstract

Aim: To determine whether a simple question about maternal recall of postpartum depressive symptoms could aid in identifying maternal distress at 18 months postpartum. Results: With one exception (spouse relationship stress), low PD mothers reported the most favourable and high PD mothers the least favourable outcomes in terms of stress, perceived child difficulty and problems handling child mobility, with medium PD mothers in between. All these differences were significant. Effect sizes were small to large.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510003

Research Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Educational Intervention to Improve Nursing Practice in the Critical Care Setting

Ann-Charlotte Falk
Abstract

A variety of educational interventions may have an impact on patient assessment and patient outcome. Studies have reported an inconsistency in the use of Neurological assessments performed by nurses, such as the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) in the acute care setting. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of an educational intervention for nurses on the number of performed neurological assessments over time.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510002

Research Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Burnout at the Frontline: The Effect of a Reproductive Health Voucher Program on Health Workers in Uganda

Carinne Brody, John Michea Irige, Ben Bellows
Abstract

Low job satisfaction among healthcare workers in developing countries can increase risk of burnout and have a negative effect on the quality of services. Novel financing strategies such as voucher programs, which aim to increase the utilization of services by the poor by offering physical vouchers for subsidized care, may unintentionally exacerbate burnout for health care workers by creating higher workloads.

PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510001


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