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Mini Review  |   Volume 2, Issue 2

Combining Breastfeeding and Employment: The Salient Beliefs of Nurses Working Shift Working in a Hospital

Jean Marie Schlittenhart
Abstract

Current federal legislation, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, provides for the support of lactating women in the workforce. Previous to this enactment employers were not required to provide breaks for lactating women to express milk for their nursing infant. Howbeit, breastfeeding benefits have been endorsed by American Academy of Pediatric for growth and development (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2012). Now, the United States Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division requires employer to provide to employees a reasonable break time to express breast milk for a nursing child up to 1 year.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510047

Review Article  |   Volume 2, Issue 2

Bingo! Team-Based Game in English Medical Terminology for Baccalaureate Nursing Students

Ching-Hsing Hsieh
Abstract

In medical service settings in Taiwan, English medical terminology is used for writing medical admission notes, medication administration records, and nursing kardexes. Nurses use English medical terminology to interact with health care professionals and to understand patient charts, laboratory data, and nursing kardexes. For nurses, understanding and using English medical terminology is an important ability to perform their responsibilities efficiently and safely. However, many clinical nurses in Taiwan mentioned that they need to continue increasing their competency of English medical terminology.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510046

Review Article  |   Volume 2, Issue 2

Interventions of Music: Reviewing Evidence for Better Practice

Mindi Miller, Brianna Fox and Abbey Brown
Abstract

There is growing evidence that music assists with healing and well-being. Music is known to have widespread common characteristics, yet there are individual cognitive and emotional differences that make the operationalization of music therapy challenging. The work of two baccalaureate honors students became the catalyst for doing additional literature critiques on music therapy. Best practice guidelines for music therapy is in its infancy, as is the specialty of certified music therapists. Music terms are often interchangeable, complicating the review of best practices. Music therapy infers long term use while music intervention implies short term applications.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510045

Review Article  |   Volume 2, Issue 2

Measuring Acceptability of Clinical Decision Rules Using the Ottawa Acceptability of Decision Rules Instrument (OADRI): A Pediatric Emergency Care Study

Evelien de Vos-Kerkhof, Dorien H.F. Geurts, Ida J. Korfage, Yvonne Vergouwe, Angeline Slager-Lodders, Henriette A. Moll and Rianne Oostenbrink
Abstract

For successful practical implementation of clinical decision rules, measuring their acceptability is essential. The Ottawa Acceptability of Decision Rules Instrument (OADRI) was developed to serve this need. The OADRI was translated into Dutch according to international guidelines. Decision rule acceptability was measured during three different moments of two impact trials. We described OADRI mean item scores and diversity of answer possibilities, where > 50% "No opinion/Don't know" where defined as non-informative OADRI items.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510044

Commentary  |   Volume 2, Issue 2

The Need for Safe Patient Handling Programs

Guy Fragala
Abstract

Healthcare today faces numerous challenges and opportunities for improvement, and many of these issues relate to providing efficient high level care in a cost efficient manner. Efforts to meet these challenges are driven by better standards for care evolving from the evidence base created through research and practices which when applied lead to better outcomes. However, the demands presented to the healthcare practitioner to integrate the new concepts for care into the current environment of care have added to the complexity of these challenges.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510043

Review Article  |   Volume 2, Issue 2

Conceptualizing the Relationships between Organizational Cultures, Nurse Leaders and the Nurse Practice Environments: A Historical Perspective

Edith A. West
Abstract

In an article entitled, From Tall Poppies to Squashed Weeds: Why Don't Nurses Pull Together More, Farrell concluded that it was not only the alleged misogyny intrinsic to oppression or feminist theory that shackled and impeded nurses, but nurses themselves who in their everyday work and interpersonal interactions, act as insidious gatekeepers to an iniquitous status quo.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510042

Review Article  |   Volume 2, Issue 2

Assessing Awareness of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) among Nurse Practitioners: A Pilot Study

Mary Beth Wilson Steck, Julia A. Eggert, Veronica G. Parker, Lee A. Crandall and Bonnie J. Holaday
Abstract

Nurse practitioners (NPs) need be aware of the ethical and social implications of diagnosing, testing and managing genetic diseases in their patients. Before the start of the Human Genome Project, the degree of protection in state laws in the United States against genetic discrimination varied broadly. Thus, a federal law, the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) was passed in 2008.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510041

Case report  |   Volume 2, Issue 2

An Untapped Resource in Patient Centered Care - The Role of Spirituality

L. Abraham and D. Dunn
Abstract

In our 25 year experience delivering care to a frail elderly population our Geriatric Team has noted that many of our health care colleagues do not routinely assess the spiritual needs of sick persons. There is no consistent assessment of this need in the routine medical care of older patients. This spiritual need has to be understood in terms of the whole person-the emotional, social and spiritual dimensions of our being, as well as the physical.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2469-5823/1510040