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Non-systematic Review  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

To Give or Not To Give - Is that the Question?: The Changing Face of Emergency Oxygen Therapy

Carol Ann Kelly and Dave Lynes
Abstract

Oxygen's image, together with its reputation, is changing. No longer is it regarded as a benign panacea for all clinical presentations; indeed it is now increasingly evident that oxygen has the potential to contribute to clinical deterioration and mortality. There is an emerging recognition that oxygen is a drug when administered as a therapeutic intervention and should be used with caution. Contemporary guidelines offer criteria and directives for administration and prescription of oxygen, dependant on the patient's condition, acuity and care setting, yet clinical audit and gathering evidence repeatedly demonstrates that poor practice persists.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2474-3674/1510005

Research Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Cerebral Fat Embolism Syndrome: Diagnostic State of the Art: with and without Intra-medullary Fixation, with and without Long Bone Fractures

Bethany Radin DO, H Neal Reynolds, Uttam K Bodanapally and David Dreizin
Abstract

Objective: To review the spectrum of scenarios in which cerebral fat embolism syndrome (CFES) may present, the clinical presentation, traditional diagnostic criteria, and current diagnostic technologies. Methods: Three cases are presented representing Classical presentation (CFES presenting after Intramedullary rods for long bone fractures), Atypical presentation (CFES presenting after long bone fractures without intramedullary rods), and Unexpected presentation (CFES without any long bone fractures). All diagnoses were confirmed with MRI studies. Literature was reviewed on the spectrum of presentations, classical diagnostic criteria, clinical presentations, and use of MRI to confirm diagnosis.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2474-3674/1510004

Original Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Albuminuria in Critically lll Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study

oortje Godijn, Simone M Smits and Peter HJ van der Voort
Abstract

In the intensive care unit (ICU) physicians are challenged to predict patient outcome when patients are admitted. Over the years, several tools have been developed for this purpose. Examples are the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) and Sepsis Related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scoring systems.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2474-3674/1510003

Review Article  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Use of Dexmedetomidine in the Management of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome in Critically Ill Patients

Julie Kalabalik and Jesse B. Sullivan
Abstract

Alcohol consumption plays a role in the development of over 200 diseases and conditions in individuals worldwide, including liver cirrhosis, cancers, traumatic injury, and alcohol dependence. In hospitalized patients with alcohol use disorders (AUD), up to 25% will develop acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS). In critically ill patients, presence of AWS is associated with increased duration of mechanical ventilation, prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS), more frequent infectious complications and higher mortality.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2474-3674/1510002

Editorial  |   Volume 1, Issue 1

Protocols for Uncontrolled Donation after Circulatory Death: International & Comprehensive Analysis

Ivan Ortega Deballon
Abstract

Determination of death, the exact moment that a person's death occurs, has been a constant challenge throughout human being history. What we already know is that death usually does not occur abruptly, at a specific time and for all parts of the body simultaneously. Human resistance to degradation by lack of oxygen varies depending on the type of cell and organ. It is possible, for example, for successful cornea transplants from deceased individuals as many as seven days after death. Actually, the absolute absence of any residual vital activity in the body after cessation of circulatory function can only be confirmed once the putrefaction process is fully established and completely widespread throughout the corpse.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2474-3674/1510001