International Journal of

Neurology and NeurotherapyISSN: 2378-3001

Archive

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2378-3001/1/1/1013

The Importance of Stimulation Cycle in Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Drug-Resistant Epilepsies- Our Experience and Literature Review

Nicola Montano, Filomena Fuggetta, Fabio Papacci, Rina Di Bonaventura, Mario Meglio and Gabriella Colicchio

Article Type: Review Article | First Published: December 17, 2014

The impact of stimulation cycle on the outcome of patients submitted to Vagal Nerve Stimulation (VNS) has been only marginally investigated in the literature. Nonetheless this is an important factor in term of tolerability of side effects, duration of generator and costs of therapy. Here the role of this parameter was evaluated on 21 patients who underwent to VNS implant at our Institution from January 1994 to February 2011 and responded to VNS (they reported a stable decrease of seizure number ...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2378-3001/1/1/1012

Randomised Clinical Trial Comparing the Efficacy of A Gluten-Free Diet Versus A Regular Diet in A Series of Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients

Rodrigo L, Hernandez-Lahoz C, Fuentes D, Mauri G, Alvarez N, Vega J and Gonzalez S

Article Type: Original Article | First Published: December 08, 2014

Objectives: To analyse the clinical efficacy of a Gluten-Free Diet (GFD) compared with a Regular Diet (RD) in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) patients. Methods: Seventy-two RRMS patients were included into a prospective study. Annual relapse rate (ARR), Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and lesional activity were compared. Patients were randomly separated according to diet: (GFD, n=36) and (RD, n=36). Follow-up study period was 5.3 1.6 years (median 4.5 years). Results:...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2378-3001/1/1/1011

D-Leucine Suppresses Prion Formation in Prion-Infected Culture Cells

Kana Miyashita, Morika Suzuki, Kana Nishijima and Naomi Hachiya

Article Type: Short Communication | First Published: November 24, 2014

Prion disease is an infectious and fatal disease. The pathogen consists of an abnormal form of the prion protein; designated PrPSc. PrPSc is insoluble, highly resistant to digestion by proteases and all disinfectants. In contrast, the cellular form of prion protein PrPC is easily soluble and digested by proteases. Direct interaction between PrPSc and PrPC is believed to induce the propagation of prions; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this step have not been clarified. Despite effor...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2378-3001/1/1/1010

Plasma Homocysteine Levels in Neuromyelitis Optica

Lei Zhang, Yaqing Shu, Shaoyang Sun, Yinyao Lin, Yanqiang Wang, Bingjun Zhang and Xuejiao Men

Article Type: Original Article | First Published: October 30, 2014

Background and purpose: Homocysteine has been implicated in many kinds of neurologic diseases by inducing oxidative injury which is considered one of the pathogenic mechanisms of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). The aim of this study was to investigate whether there were any relationship between plasma homocysteine and clinical features of NMO patients. Methods: We measured plasma homocysteine in 66 patients with NMO and 66 controls. Results: The patients with NMO had significantly higher homocys...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2378-3001/1/1/1009

The Character and Frequency of Muscular Pain in Myotonic Dystrophy and Their Relationship to Myotonia

Parmova O, Vohanka S, Strenkova J

Article Type: Research Article | First Published: October 29, 2014

Background: Myotonic dystrophy is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in adults. Pain is reported in various hereditary muscular diseases at a frequency of 64%83%. Methods: A group of 70 patients with myotonic dystrophy (21 persons with type 1 and 49 with type 2) was investigated by means of questionnaires structured around the subject of pain. Results: The frequency of long-term muscle pain was 57% in patients suffering from myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 55% among those with type 2....

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2378-3001/1/1/1008

Novel Aneurysm Grown from a PcomA Infundibulum after Embolization of a Contralateral Posterior Communicating Aneurysm in an Isolated Polycystic Hepatic Patient: A Case Report

Rui Zhao, Chao Zou, Chuan-Chuan Wang, Qing-Hai Huang and Jian-Min Liu

Article Type: Case Report | First Published: October 27, 2014

We present a case of a posterior communicating (Pcom) artery infundibulum that progressed to an aneurysm in a patient with Polycystic liver disease without kidney cyst after embolization of the controlateral Pcom aneurysm. The infundibulum had been documented on angiography 4 years earlier, while a ruptured controlateral Pcom aneurysm was embolised. The patient presented to the outpatient clinic with right postorbital headache and cranial Ⅲ nerve palsy. Head CT scan found no gross subarach...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2378-3001/1/1/1007

Environmental Risk Factors and Gene-Environment Interactions for the Development of Multiple Sclerosis

Hikoaki Fukaura

Article Type: Review Article | First Published: October 22, 2014

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating autoimmune disorder of the Central Nervous System (CNS). The typical disease course is Relapsing-Remitting (RR) MS and treatment with Disease Modifying Treatment (DMT) should be initiated as soon as possible following a diagnosis of relapsing MS for individuals with a first clinical event and MRI features consistent with MS, in whom other possible causes have been excluded. Patients with MS tend to do not completely recover from relapses w...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2378-3001/1/1/1006

Celiac Disease in Multiple Sclerosis: A Controversial Issue

Silvia Salvatore, Alessandra Tozzo and Luigi Nespoli

Article Type: Review Article | First Published: October 22, 2014

Celiac disease is a common immune mediated disorder elicited by gluten that may manifest with neurological symptoms independent to gastrointestinal manifestations. The real prevalence of celiac disease in multiple sclerosis is still unclear because of limited population studies, different diagnostic assessment and possible non-celiac related response to gluten free diet. Recent studies have contributed to clarify genetic and immune overlap and discrepancy between the two conditions and are discu...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2378-3001/1/1/1005

Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome Presenting With Meningoencephalitis; an Uncommon Presentation: A Case Report

Sonali Sihindi Chapa Gunatilake, Sanjeewa Bowatta Shalika Udayanga Jayasingha, Salinda Bandara, Sunethra Bandaranayake Athauda and Harith Wimalaratna

Article Type: Case Report | First Published: October 20, 2014

Introduction: Hypereosinophilic syndrome is a rare heterogeneous disorder characterized by persistent eosinophilia with eosinophil mediated tissue infitration and organ dysfunction in the absence of a secondary cause. Clinical presentations involving nervous system vary markedly causing encephalopathy, thromboembolic disease or peripheral neuropathy. Eosinophilic infitration of meninges and central nervous system causing meningo-encephalitis is a rare presentation in hypereosinophilic syndrome a...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2378-3001/1/1/1004

Contralateral Basal Ganglia Atrophy in Acquired HemichoreaHemiballism

Zaheer F, Sudhakar P, Escott E and Cambi F

Article Type: Case Report | First Published: October 20, 2014

Hemichorea-Hemiballism (HCHB) is a hyperkinetic condition characterized by abnormal, migratory, continuous, non-patterned movements of one side of the body. It results from involvement of contralateral basal ganglia that may be affected by metabolic, neoplastic, infectious, autoimmune [1], toxic or neurodegenerative processes [2]. The most common cause is ischemia from a focal vascular lesion [3]. Non-ketotic hyperglycemia has been reported as the second most common cause of HCHB in the Asian po...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2378-3001/1/1/1003

Therapeutic Significance of Frequency of Deep Brain Stimulation in Intractable Epilepsy

Alok Gupta and Harinder Jaseja

Article Type: Letter to Editor | First Published: September 30, 2014

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is emerging as a viable alternative therapy in intractable epilepsy (IE), and although the exact mechanism and electrophysiology of its action remain elusive, some neuroscientists even believe that DBS may in near future become a first line treatment for the patients with IE who are not suitable candidates for epilepsy brain surgery. In addition to the exact placement of electrodes in the target site, the successful outcome of DBS depends largely upon correct choice ...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2378-3001/1/1/1002

Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease: An Inherited Leukodystrophy Natural History Studies in Understanding Neurogenetic Disorders

Jeremy J. Laukka

Article Type: Editorial | First Published: September 29, 2014

More than a century ago, in 1885 Friedrich Pelizaeus, a German Physician first identified a genetic disorder in five boys in a single family with nystagmus, spasticity of the limbs and developmental delay. Twenty-five years later in 1910, Ludwig Merzbacher independently reexamined this family and described further the neuropathology of 14 affected individuals and found that all affected members shared a common ancestor. Together, Pelizaeus and Merzbacher identified the exclusive X-linked inherit...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2378-3001/1/1/1001

Deep Brain Stimulation Frequency Modulation in Parkinson Disease - One Size May Not Fit All

Ritesh A. Ramdhani

Article Type: Editorial | First Published: September 11, 2014

Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an effective therapeutic modality for patients with Parkinson's Disease who have developed complications from longstanding levodopa such as dyskinesias and motor fluctuations. It produces robust responses to segmental symptoms (ie, bradykinesia, tremor, rigidity) while attenuating involuntary dyskinetic movements and smoothing out 'on' and 'off' period cycling. The subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus internaare widely accepted surgical targets for stimulat...

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