International Journal of

Transplantation Research and MedicineISSN: 2572-4045

Archive

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2572-4045.1510045

The Bone in Renal Transplant Recipients-A Nephrological and Orthopedic Review

Natacha Rodrigues, Filipe Rodrigues, Alice Santana and Pedro Neves

Article Type: Review Article | First Published: October 21, 2019

The definition of Chronic Kidney Disease - Mineral Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD) has suffered significant changes over the last decade as our knowledge on the matter grows. The complexity of this subject is even bigger if you consider renal transplant recipients (RTRs) - they already have a legacy of CKD-MBD previous to transplant, their bones will be under the direct and indirect effects of immunosuppression and they will develop CKD-MBD secondary to their graft (dis) function. All these issues occur...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2572-4045.1510044

Heart Transplant Patients with Severe Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy Have More Silent Ischemia and Non-Sustained Ventricular Tachycardia

Katrine Berg, Kamillla Pernille Bjerre, Tor Skibsted Clemmensen, Brian Bridal Logstrup, Henning Molgaard, Steen Hvitfeldt Poulsen and Hans Eiskjær

Article Type: Original Articl e | First Published: September 23, 2019

The incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) following heart transplantation (HTx) accounts for approximately 20% of post HTx deaths. Ischemia, bradyand tachy-arrhythmias caused by rejection and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) seem related to SCD. Hence, we aimed to investigate the relation between CAV, arrhythmias and silent ischemia in long-term HTx patients. 49 HTx patients were included. Patients were CAV-classified in accordance with guidelines from International Society of Heart and Lu...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/2572-4045.1510043

Preemptive Cautions Prior to Final Intestinal Transplantation: Four Golden Criteria in Predicting the Outcome and Long- Term Survival of Short Bowel Syndrome: Is the Remaining Bowel Length is at or above 50 Cm? Can Patient Survive Over 24 Months in spite of any Complications? Younger Age? and Lesser Accompanying Co-Morbidity?

Ethem Unal, MD

Article Type: Short Commentary | First Published: August 26, 2019

The principal aim at the initial surgery is to preserve life, then to preserve gut length, and maintain its continuity. In the immediate postoperative period, there needs to be a balance between keeping the patient alive through the use of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and antisecretory agents, and promoting gut adaptation with the use of oral nutrition. If following this, the patient still has a short bowel syndrome (SBS), then the principal options remain either long term TPN, or intestinal...

Volume 5
Issue 2