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Case Report  |   Volume 4, Issue 7

Burkitt's Lymphoma Presenting as Endobronchial Lesion

Fatih Uzer, Levent Dertsiz and Aykut Cilli
Abstract

Primary endobronchial tumor is seen rarely in young adults. Benign neoplasms such as hamartoma, hemangioma, papilloma, leiomyoma are seen more often whereas maling conditions are infrequent. Lymphoma is quite rare in children.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410178

Case Report  |   Volume 4, Issue 7

Severe ANCA Associated Vasculitis in the Setting of Cocaine Abuse: A Case Report

Ana Ramirez Berlioz, Orlando Garner, Eliana Wiesner, Alfredo Iardino Scarano and Kalpana Bhairavarasu
Abstract

A 41-year-old Hispanic female with known medical history significant for bronchial asthma presents to the Emergency Department (ED) in February 2010, complaining of a 3-week long history of an erythematous tender rash with irregular margins on the tip of her nose, upper and lower extremities (Figure 1) accompanied by bilateral elbow, knee and ankle pain.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410177

Review Article  |   Volume 4, Issue 7

Evaluation of the Functional and Clinical Outcome of Intramedullary Osteosynthesis with Gamma Nail in Treatment of Unstable Peritrochanteric Fractures

Hatim Mohammed A ALShareef, Hossam Mohammed Aref, Ahmed H AlHasan, Amer Mohammed A ALShreef and Mohammed Abdul Wahab Al Juhani1
Abstract

Peritrochanteric fractures of the femur rank among the most severe fractures in elderly people. The Gamma Nail is one of the latest advance in the treatment of trochanteric fractures based on intramedullary nailing principles during closed procedures.

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410176

Case Study  |   Volume 4, Issue 7

Gaisbock's Syndrome: A Case Study

J Kelly Smith
Abstract

A 57-year-old hypertensive, obese woman presented with several weeks of a febrile flu-like illness, facial and extremity flushing, and laboratory findings of polycythemia. A workup revealed no evidence of polycythemia rubra vera or a secondary cause of her polycythemia (her erythropoietin level was normal, she had no splenomegaly, and a test for JAK2 v617F mutation was negative).

  PDF   |    Full Text | DOI: 10.23937/2378-3656/1410175