Neurosurgery - Cases and Reviews

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 Open Access DOI:10.23937/NCR-2017/1710012

Cerebello-Pontine Angle Glioblastoma with Cervical Spine Metastasis: A Case Report

Giuseppe Mariniello, MD, Carmela Peca, MD, Maria Laura Del Basso De Caro, MD, Sergio Corvino, MD, Valentina Orlando, MD, Elia Guadagno, MD and Francesco Maiuri, MD

Article Type: Case Report | First Published: February 14, 2019

This article reports a left cerebellopontine angle glioblastoma presenting with two week history of rapidly progressive hearing loss and trigeminal pain, treated by subtotal resection and radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. At one year, local tumor control and diffuse neoplastic seeding in the cervical spinal cord were evidenced. Glioblastomas involving the cerebellopontine angle are exceptional with only 10 reported cases. The possibility of a glioblastoma should be conside...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/ncr-2017/1710011

Pathology Confirmation of Particle Embolization of Middle Meningeal Artery for Management of Subdural Hematoma

Pouya Entezami, MD, Emad Nourollahzadeh, MD, Adedamola Adepoju, MD, David Michael Jones, MD and John Dalfino, MD

Article Type: Case Report | First Published: February 11, 2019

As our patient population grows older with improved health care technology and resources, chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is an increasingly common disease faced by the modern neurosurgeon. Despite good results with burr-hole irrigation and evacuation - the gold standard treatment for CSDH - recurrence rate remains high. Recent advancements in endovascular management of this diagnosis via embolization of the middle meningeal artery (MMA), either alone or in conjunction with surgical evacuation,...

 Open Access DOI:10.23937/ncr-2017/1710010

Delayed Revascularization of Basilar Artery Occlusion due to Symptomatic Progression

Pouya Entezami, M Reid Gooch, Emad Nourollahzadeh and John Dalfino

Article Type: Case Report | First Published: January 21, 2019

The basilar artery is the main arterial contributor to the posterior circulation. Interruptions of this flow can cause devastating strokes and neurological demise. While most patients with a basilar artery occlusion suffer from a high rate or morbidity and/or mortality, a small subset survive but have progressive symptomatic decline. Delayed revascularization of these patients with chronic basilar artery occlusions based on symptomatic progression may provide a favorable risk-benefit ratio, but ...

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